Design and layout of foodservice facilities pdf

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Design and Layout of Foodservice Facilities

Published simultaneously in Canada. Anniversary Logo Design : Richard Pacifico. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section or of the United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc.

No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation.

You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor the author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. For general information on our other products and services or for technical support, please contact our Customer Care Department within the United States at , outside the United States at or fax Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats.

Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic formats. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN cloth 1. Food service management. Food serviceEquipment and supplies. RestaurantsDesign and construction. M27B57 Dedication The third edition and revision of Design and Layout of Foodservice Facilities involved the skills and talents of many people including the great folks at John Wiley, equipment representatives, architects, engineers, and teachers who have used this book in the classroom.

This book is dedicated to the two people who assisted the author in more ways than I can recount, John C. Birchfield, Jr. Preface The foodservice industry is evolving rapidly to keep pace with changes in consumer needs and expectations. In the commercial sector, new restaurant concepts are emerging to satisfy an increasingly discriminating market. In the off-site sectors of the industry formerly known as noncommercial sectors , such as health care, education, and business and industry, foodservice is becoming increasingly market driven.

These changes occurring throughout the industry call for the creation of new foodservice facilities as well as the renovation of existing facilities. The professional foodservice manager is likely to be involved in the design of a new or renovated facility several times during his or her career.

Design and Layout of Foodservice Facilities is intended to be a resource for hospitality professionals involved in a design project, for college and university students preparing for careers in foodservice management, and for design professionals who wish to know more about the foodservice design process, beginning with market research and financial feasibility studies and including design principles, equipment selection, and engineering.

It includes: Suggestions for using the textbook in a week semester Background information for each chapter that is useful in preparing lectures Student homework assignments for each chapter, many using Internet resources Examination questions and answers for each chapter Guidelines for assigning and evaluating a student design exercise as a major project Please contact your Wiley sales representative to get a copy of the Instructors Manual.

If you do not know who your representative is, please visit www. The Instructors Manual is available to qualified instructors on the companion website at www. PowerPoint slides are also available for download on the web site. Acknowledgments The author wishes to recognize and thank John Birchfield Jr.

He is also grateful to the Nestle Library at Cornell Universitys School of Hotel Administration for providing the information for the bibliography. The author would also like to acknowledge these reviewers for their insight and recommendations throughout the manuscript preparation process: John Bandman of The Art Institute of New York City, Paul J.

Thornton of San Antonio College. The foodservice facility plans in this book are provided courtesy of Birchfield Jacobs Foodsystems, Inc.

About the Author John C. Birchfield was an associate professor of hotel, restaurant, and institutional management at Michigan State University and has operational experience in hotels, clubs, restaurants, and colleges. In Mr. Birchfield also holds a masters degree from Rutgers University in the field of institutional management and nutrition.

Birchfield is the author of many articles and two books on foodservice and management, The Contemporary Quantity Recipe File, published by Cahners Books, and the comprehensive Foodservice Operations Manual, published by Van Nostrand Reinhold.

He served on the advisory board of Cahners Publishing Company for three years and has been a guest columnist for Food Management Magazine.

Birchfield has designed numerous foodservice facilities and has served as an operations consultant to many institutions, hotels, and clubs in the United States and Europe. Assists the reader in determining the scope of a project, which in turn will determine the complexity of the planning process Explains the process of concept development for hotels, chains, restaurants, and institutions Guides the person who is contemplating a design or equipment replacement project through the decision-making process regarding menu, market, management, money, and method of execution Introduces the elements of a feasibility study and outlines the different kinds of feasibility research that are necessary before designing a foodservice facility.

The scope of the project influences the design approach taken by the owner or manager. If the project involves only the layout of a new hot-food production area for an existing restaurant, the approach used and the planning process will be fairly simple. If the project entails the construction of a new restaurant or the complete renovation of an existing facility, the planning process becomes more difficult. And if the project includes the construction of a new facility that is to serve as the prototype for a chain or franchise, the planning process is even more complex.

Scope can be divided into four levels of complexity, each of which requires the involvement of different individuals and different amounts of planning time. Determining the scope of the project is an important first step before the planning begins. Projects of level I scope involve no more than the selection of a major piece of equipment or the replacement of a small area of a foodservice facility.

Examples of level I projects include: Replacement of a dish machine and dish tables in a school cafeteria Replacement of the display refrigerator and service counter in a delicatessen. Purchase and installation of an outdoor walk-in freezer in a nursing home Replacement of the range section in a country club Projects of level I scope typically can be carried out under the leadership of the owner or manager, assuming that he or she is familiar with foodservice equipment and has a good grasp of the workings of the food facility.

If the owner does not have a working knowledge of equipment, a food facilities design consultant may be needed. Figure 1. Level II scope projects involve the renovation of a significant portion of an existing foodservice facility. Examples of level II scope projects include: Renovation of the entire service area in a university foodservice facility Replacement of all of the walk-in coolers and freezers in a country club Task Planning Equipment selection Design and engineering Preparing bid documents Equipment delivery Installation Level I 1 week 1 week 1 week 2 days 46 weeks 35 days Level II 4 weeks 2 weeks 4 weeks 4 weeks 23 months 26 weeks Level III 6 weeks 1 month 2 months 2 months 46 months 13 months Level IV 3 months 2 months 4 months 2 months 46 months 13 months.

Scope of a Project Replacement and relocation of the warewashing system in a hospital Addition of banquet rooms and serving kitchens in a hotel The professionals likely to be involved in level II scope projects include the owner, an architect, mechanical and electrical engineers, a foodservice facility design consultant, a construction company or general contractor, and a kitchen equipment contractor. The roles of these individuals are described in Chapter 2.

A full complement of professionals is necessary at level II because such projects are complex and require expertise in construction, engineering, and foodservice equipment layout and design. Level II scope projects require a much longer time to complete than level I projects. Level III scope projects involve the complete renovation of an existing foodservice facility or the design and construction of a new foodservice facility.

Examples of level III scope projects include: Renovation of the dietary department of a hospital Construction of a new theme restaurant Renovation of the kitchen, service, and dining areas in a country club The development of foodservices for a new hotel The planning process for the renovation of a foodservice facility often is even more complex than designing a new facility because of the difficulty of dealing with existing walls, structural members, utilities, and space and the demolition of parts of the existing structure.

Moreover, in renovation projects, decisions must be made about which pieces of existing equipment should or could be used in the newly renovated facility. The professionals likely to be involved in level III scope projects include the owner, an architect, mechanical and electrical engineers, a foodservice facility design consultant, an interior designer, a general contractor, and a kitchen equipment contractor.

Level III scope projects may take from one to three years from design to completion. Level IV scope projects involve the development of a chain or franchise prototype. Chain or prototype foodservice facilities require intense planning and design efforts because they will be constructed in multiple locations.

Inefficiencies in design or inadequacies in equipment could be repeated hundreds of times and thus will be exceptionally expensive to correct. Such projects, in addition to the requirements of level III scope projects, involve a corporate strategy, a well-researched marketing plan, complex financial planning, and a strong management team.

The food facility design at level IV must fit the needs of the menu, market, strategy, and financial package that are being developed by the corporation. The time required for a level IV scope project is longer than for a level III project in the design phases but may be shorter in the construction phases.

Level III and IV should not proceed unless a budget matching the expectations of the scope is prepared. Once the scope has been determined and the budget has been approved, the owner can move forward with the project.

In level I and level II scope projects, moving forward means going directly to the design process. However, when the scope of the project involves a major renovation of an existing facility or the development and construction of a new foodservice facility, the next step in the process is concept development.

A foodservice operations concept is expressed in many ways, including its menu, decor, form of service, pricing, and location. Concept development means developing a plan for the success of the operation in its market in advance of actually designinglet alone buildingthe facility. It is not unusual for a person to consider a new restaurant or, in fact, to open a new restaurant without knowing what type of food facility will have the best chance of succeeding.

The potential entrepreneur may have some investment money, a location or a theme in mind, and a great amount of enthusiasm for the food business, but may not really have thought through the total concept of the operation. Unfortunately, enthusiasm and great food products are only half of the success equation.

The other half of the equation is the market. Concept development precedes the actual design of a foodservice facility because the foodservice design team must know what the menu, demand, hours of operation, and mode of service will be. The client who most frequently comes to the food facilities design consultant for help with concept development is the individual restaurant owner.

The restaurant owner typically organizes a corporation comprised of a small number of local businesspeople and then begins to develop a concept that will eventually become a freestanding restaurant. The success or failure of the venture often depends on how well the concept was planned and how well the plan was followed. Commonly found concepts often are described in terms of these general 1 Adapted. Chan and R. Sparrowe, Welcome to Hospitality: An Introduction, 2nd ed.

Albany, NY: Delmar, Concept Development categories: Fine-dining restaurants. Fine-dining restaurants are distinguished by fine cuisine prepared by celebrity chefs, attentive service, stylish decor, and high prices. Theme restaurants. Theme restaurants offer a dining experience that evokes special times, places, or events, such as English pubs, restaurants owned by sports celebrities, and re-creations of diners from the s. Casual dinner houses. Casual dinner houses emphasize a comfortable and contemporary decor as well as high value.

Well-known casual dinner houses are not single-unit restaurants, but chains such as Chilis, T. Fridays, and Outback Steakhouse. Ethnic restaurants. Ethnic restaurants are closely tied to the cultures or foodways from which they originated. Family restaurants.

Design and Layout of Foodservice Facilities [3rd ed., [rev. and updated]]0471699632, 9780471699637

Home Assignments Lessons and Notes Sitemap. Lessons and Notes. Christopher Mercer. Perry CPA. DeLuccia IV.

John C. Birchfield has authored numerous articles and two other books on foodservice management, and has been a guest columnist for Food Management magazine. About the Author. Chapter 1: Preliminary Planning. Scope of a Project. Concept Development.

To browse Academia. Skip to main content. By using our site, you agree to our collection of information through the use of cookies. To learn more, view our Privacy Policy. Log In Sign Up. Download Free PDF. Chapter 2.


P1: OTE JWPRBIRCHFIELD September 7, Design and Layout of Foodservice Facilities Third Edition John C. Birchfield JOHN WILEY & SONS.


Development of a Layout Model Suitable for the Food Processing Industry

Wanniarachchi, R. Gopura, H. The food processing industry is a subset of the manufacturing sector with unique challenges. Among these, ensuring food hygiene and preventing contamination are two issues of prime importance.

John C. Birchfield has authored numerous articles and two other books on foodservice management, and has been a guest columnist for Food Management magazine. About the Author.

Published simultaneously in Canada. Anniversary Logo Design : Richard Pacifico. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section or of the United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc.

Published simultaneously in Canada. Anniversary Logo Design : Richard Pacifico. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section or of the United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc.

Design And Layout Of Foodservice Facilities.ppt

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any formor by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except aspermitted under Section or of the United States Copyright Act, without either the priorwritten permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy feeto the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives orwritten sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situa-tion. You should consult with a professional where appropriate.

Facility layout and design is an important component of a business's overall operations, both in terms of maximizing the effectiveness of the production process and meeting the needs of employees. The basic objective of layout is to ensure a smooth flow of work, material, and information through a system. The basic meaning of facility is the space in which a business's activities take place. The layout and design of that space impact greatly how the work is done—the flow of work, materials, and information through the system.

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